10 Comments

Christians Should Not Be Political Pacifists, Says Megachurch Pastor


One guess where this “Mega-Church” pastor said this….

Christians and church leaders should not be passive when it comes to politics or social issues, said author and pastor Robert Jeffress during an interview on Dr. James Dobson’s Family Talk on Monday. 

Continuing on…

Jeffress, who is the senior pastor of the 10,000-member First Baptist Church of Dallas, said he disagrees with the old adage that says people should not mix politics with religion….”I believe God has called us to be influencers of our culture,” he continued. “I am just so amazed at the number of Christians and even pastors who say well, ‘you shouldn’t mix politics with religion.’ To which I say, ‘what should you mix it with then?'”

Jeffress, whose latest book is “Twilight’s Last Gleaming: How America’s Last Days Can Be Your Best Days”, said that although the nation will eventually come to an end as the Bible says of the entire world, Christians are called to continue fulfilling God’s commission….

“When anyone says that Christians shouldn’t get involved in politics or policy I have to ask them the questions, ‘Do you think that God cares about millions of babies being murdered every year in the world? Do you think that God cares about the rampant immorality that’s engulfing our country? Do you think God cares that His name is being outlawed from mention in the public square?’

The God I know hasn’t changed. He’s the same yesterday, today, and forever. If you believe God cares about those things then you’ve just answered the question [as to] why Christians need to get involved in policy,” the Texas pastor said.  CPost

Amen, he’s right: Jesus Christ is the  same yesterday and today and forever, so let us follow Christ’s example (and that of the early Church) and seek to bring about change by political activism!

Oops, that’s right, Jesus and the early Church never did that. My bad.   

10 comments on “Christians Should Not Be Political Pacifists, Says Megachurch Pastor

  1. Jesus does care about those things, but He died for the souls of men. And those things change only through the gospel.

  2. Very interesting that he leaves things like corporate corruption and widespread usury off the list. Guess these kinds of things weren’t very important to Jesus (Jesus the politician that is). I think I prefer to put my trust in the Jesus of the Bible instead, the one who changes peoples inward most hearts rather than their outward politics as Rick so correctly noted in his comment.

  3. We’re strangers and aliens living in the confounds of Babylon. We should always be working for the peace of the city. But our home lies elsewhere.

    But what does this man advocate? Dump oneself into America, feed the machine, spread war and violence as the standard of the Empire waves in the breeze. He may say that this empire may pass away, but he doesn’t believe it.

  4. Hey-we all need another new book written by a mega Pastor that tells us what America needs to do

  5. We must see the profound error and the manipulation that is in Jeffres kind of rhetorical questions. “Does God care …?” God is able to take care of His own reputation in spite of man’s words or laws; the gospel is not bound; the gates of hell shall not prevail against the church when she is fulfilling her call as ambassadors of reconciliation proclaiming the gospel in the power of the Holy Spirit. Jeffres queries are designed to stir up religious fervor (jihadism, anyone?), and imply that God needs us to use the systems and means of this fallen world in order to accomplish His will for Him. Wrong! “The anger of man cannot produce the righteousness of God.”

    The deception and wickedness of this sacralist preaching is that it focuses its followers on changing every one else’s outward behavior, resulting in people who do not focus on their own conforming to Christ. Some sins are deemed worse than others–“those sins “they” do are going to destroy us all, but we moral folks are OK despite our mammon gods and icey hearts.”

    Furthermore, outward behavior does not please God nor win right standing with Him. This false christianity is like the apostasized religion of the Jews that Jesus castigated: a self-righteous religion of morality and laws that puffs up men and disregards the true desire of the Lord–humble and contrite hearts.

    • The deception and wickedness of this sacralist preaching is that it focuses its followers on changing every one else’s outward behavior, resulting in people who do not focus on their own conforming to Christ. Some sins are deemed worse than others–”those sins “they” do are going to destroy us all, but we moral folks are OK despite our mammon gods and icey hearts.”

      Excellent point!

  6. ” “Twilight’s Last Gleaming: How America’s Last Days Can Be Your Best Days”

    What a joke. It’s all about your best days? tell that to the Sundanese, Chinese, or Pakistanese believers. American pastors are so spiritually narcissistic and hollow. Ask the martyrs how Jeffries’ book would have changed their “best days”.

  7. I am truly surprised at the naivete and ignorance of Christians who appear to opt out on using their U.S. Citizenship to exercise a greater influence for the Kingdom of God.
    While I do NOT believe that we resort merely to being caught up in or being just a pawn in our political system, may I remind readers that even the Apostle Paul appealed to his Roman Citizenship to gain himself an audience before Cesar.
    Yes, prayer is important so as be “wise in the way we act towards outsiders and make the most of every opportunity, so that you may know how to answer everyone” (Col.4:6). To which some may say, “YES, but that just pertains to sharing the Gospel!”
    I submit to you that as Christians, YES we do have as our 1st priority as Citizens of the Kingdom of Heaven to be salt and light in this world for that Kingdom. But does that mean that in the meantime our godly influence in this word stops as all the while our society around us crumbles because we won’t or don’t do anything within our influence to change it, like get involved in caucuses or pray about what candidates to support and then give time, talent or $$ to be a godly influence in this world through that venue? I believe that perhaps we HAVE become “so heavenly minded (in this regard) that we are no earthly good,” and that Pastor Jeffress is trying to emphasize the kind of impact we can have for the Kingdom of God by using WHATEVER means are available to us to bring this to pass.
    To quote Edmund Burke: all that is required to evil to triumph is that good men DO NOTHING.

  8. I’ve never really liked that quote. To put it another way it says that if good men do something then evil will not triumph but if your test is scripture that simply isn’t true. The gospel says that we can’t do anything in and of ourselves but must trust in God to do His work. It’s quite a humanist quote really imho. I don’t think anyone who posts here regularly advocates inactivity or passivity in relation to how we should interact and influence people anyway.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Rooted and Grounded In Christ

Teaching Sound Doctrine & Glorifying Christ

Music from Broken Chords

Down in the human heart, crush'd by the tempter, Feelings lie buried that grace can restore; Touched by a loving heart, wakened by kindness Chords that were broken will vibrate once more. From the Hymn "Rescue the Perishing" by Fanny J. Crosby

Lead Me

"Evil men do not understand justice, but those who seek the LORD understand it fully."

I Was a Teenage Dispensationalist

It's the end (of the end) of the world as we know it...

Disrupting Culture

A blog by Dr. Jonathan Welton

%d bloggers like this: